Search Lok Sabha MPs Performance Click here
parliament
CURRENT SESSION
v/s PREVIOUS SESSION
Search Lok Sabha MPs Performance   Click here
SEATING OF THE MEMBERS
QUESTION HOUR
MOTION OF NO-CONFIDENCE IN COUNCIL OF MINISTERS
DISCUSSIONS ON PRESIDENT ADDRESS & MOTION OF THANKS
SHORT DURATION DISCUSSIONS - 193
HALF-AN-HOUR DISCUSSIONS
ADJOURNMENT MOTIONS
CALLING ATTENTION
ZERO HOUR
POINTS OF ORDER
MATTER 377
DISCUSSION UNDER RULE 184
GOVERNMENT BILLS
PRIVATE MEMBER BILLS

SEATING OF THE MEMBERS

Ruling party to sit on the right side of the chair. Opposition and other alliances to sit on the left side of the chair

QUESTION HOUR

The first hour of every sitting shall be available for the asking and answering of questions. Twenty questions shall be placed on the list of questions for oral answer on one day.

A Member is permitted to give not more than 10 notices of Questions both Starred and Unstarred combined for any day. But not more than five admitted questions, both Starred and Unstarred combined, by one member are placed on the list of questions for any one day. Out of these 5 questions, not more than one Question distinguished by the member with asterisk* as Starred is placed on the list of Questions for oral answer. This limit of one question for oral answer does not include any Short Notice Question of the member which may have been admitted for answer on that day. However, a member can have more than one Starred question in the list in the event of transfer or postponement of Questions in the printed list from one day to another.

ZERO HOUR

The time immediately following the Question Hourand laying of papers and before any listed business is taken up in the House has come to be popularly known as the `Zero Hour'.As it starts around 12 noon,this period is euphemistically termed as `Zero Hour'.For raising matters during the so-called "Zero Hour" in Lok Sabha, members give notice before 10 a.m. everyday to the Speaker stating clearly the subject which they consider to be important and wish to raise in the House.It is, of course, for the Speaker to allow or not allow raising of such matters in the House. 

Twenty matters per day as per their priority in the ballot are allowed to be raised during "Zero Hour".The order in which the matters will be raised is decided by the Speaker at his/her discretion.In the first phase, 5 matters of urgent national and international importance, as decided by the Chair, are taken up after Question Hour and laying of papers, etc.In the second phase, the remaining admitted matters of urgent public importance are taken up after 6.00 P.M. or at the end of the regular business of the House.

DISCUSSIONS ON PRESIDENT ADDRESS & MOTION OF THANKS

Article 87 (1) of the Constitution provides for an Address by the President to members of both the Houses of Parliament assembled together at the commencement of the first session after each General Election to the Lok Sabha and at the commencement of the first session each year.

In the case of the first session after each General Election to the Lok Sabha, the President addresses both Houses of Parliament after the members have made and subscribed the oath or affirmation and the Speaker of the Lok Sabha has been elected. Otherwise, in the case of the first session of each year, the President addresses members of both Houses of Parliament assembled together at a time and date notified for the commencement of the session of the two Houses. As per practice, no other business is transacted in the House till half-an-hour after the conclusion of the Address by the President. Thereafter, both the Houses meet separately in their respective Chambers where a copy of the Address is laid on the Table of each House.

Discussion on matters referred to in the Address by the President takes place on a Motion of Thanks moved by a member and seconded by another member. According to the established practice, the mover and the seconder of the Motion of Thanks are selected by the Prime Minister. On the days allotted for the discussion, the House is at liberty to discuss matters referred to in the Address. The scope of discussion is very wide and the members are free to speak on any national and/or international problem referred to in the Address. Even matters which are not specifically mentioned in the Address are brought into discussion through amendments to the Motion. The only limitation, however, in such cases is that the members cannot refer to matters which are not the direct responsibility of the Union Government.

SHORT DURATION DISCUSSIONS - 193

In order to provide opportunities to members to discuss matters of urgent public importance, a convention was established in the Lok Sabha in March 1953 whereby members could raise discussion for a short duration without a formal motion or vote thereon. This procedure was incorporated later into the Rules of Procedure under Rule 193 as „Short Duration Discussion‟.

Discussion under rule 193 does not involve a formal motion before the House. Hence, no voting takes place after discussions. The member, who gives notice makes a short statement and such of the members as have previously intimated to the Speaker, may be permitted to take part in the discussion. The member who raises the discussion has no right of reply. At the end of the discussion, the Minister concerned gives a brief reply.

HALF-AN-HOUR DISCUSSIONS

A half-an-hour discussion may be raised by a member on a matter of public importance which has been the subject of a recent question (Starred, Unstarred or Short Notice) and the answer to which needs further elucidation of facts. Normally, notice to raise a half-an-hour discussion should be given immediately after or within three days of the date on which the question, in respect of which facts are sought to be elucidated, has been answered in the House. The discussion is limited to half-an-hour and is held in the last thirty minutes of the sitting of the House. Half-an-hour discussions in the sessions other than the Budget session are usually held on three days in a week. During the Budget session, normally not more than one half-an-hour discussion is put down in a week till the disposal of financial business. There is no voting on a half-an-hour discussion as there is no formal motion before the House.

ADJOURNMENT MOTIONS

Subject to the provisions of these rules, a motion for an adjournment of the business of the House

for the purpose of discussing a definite matter of urgent public importance may be made with the consent of the Speaker.

Notice of an adjournment motion shall be given by 10.00 hours on the day on which the motion is proposed to be made to the Secretary-General.

Members shall not give more than one such notice for any one sitting.

CALLING ATTENTION

A member may, with the previous permission of the Speaker, call the attention of a Minister to any matter of urgent public importance and the Minister may make a brief statement or ask for time to make a statement at a later hour or date Provided that no member shall give more than two such notices for any one sitting. There shall be no debate.

MOTION OF NO-CONFIDENCE IN COUNCIL OF MINISTERS

A motion expressing want of confidence in the Council of Ministers may be made subject to the following restrictions, namely:-

  • leave to make the motion shall be asked for by the member when called by the Speaker;
  • The member asking for leave shall, by 10.00 hours on that day give to the Secretary-General a written notice of the motion which he proposes to move.
  • Provided that notices, received after 10.00 hours, shall be deemed to have been received at 10.00 hours on the next day on which the House sits.

If the Speaker is of opinion that the motion is in order, he shall read the motion to the House and shall request those members who are in favour of leave being granted to rise in their places, and if not less than fifty members rise accordingly, the Speaker shall declare that leave is granted and that the motion will be taken up on such day, not being more than ten days from the date on which the leave is asked for as he may appoint. If less than fifty members rise, the Speaker shall inform the member that he has not the leave of the House.

If leave is granted under sub-rule (2), the Speaker may, after considering the state of business in the House, allot a day or days or part of a day for the discussion of the motion.

The Speaker shall, at the appointed hour on the allotted day or the last of the allotted days, as the case may be, forthwith put every question necessary to determine the decision of the House on the motion. The Speaker may, if he thinks fit, prescribe a time limit for speeches.

POINTS OF ORDER

Any member can invite the Speaker‟s immediate attention to any instance of a breach of rule of the House, by raising a point of order. A point of order should relate to the interpretation or enforcement of the Rules of Procedure or conventions or such articles of the Constitution as regulate the business of the House and must raise a question which is within the cognizance of the Speaker. It can be raised only in relation to the business before the House at a particular moment. A point of order is not a point of privilege and it is not permissible for a member to raise a point of order to ask for information or to explain his position. A point of order cannot be raised against the decision of the Speaker in regard to the admissibility of notices. No debate shall be allowed on a point of order,

MATTER 377

A member who wishes to bring to the notice of the House a matter which is not a point of order, shall give notice in writing to the Secretary-General specifying clearly and precisely the text of the matter to be raised. The member shall be permitted to raise it only after the Speaker has given the consent and at

such time and date as the Speaker may fix.

No member shall raise more than one matter during a week.

DISCUSSION UNDER RULE 184

Rule 184 of the Rules of Procedure provides that “Save insofar as is otherwise provided in the Constitution or in the Rules of Procedure and Conduct of Business in Lok Sabha, no discussion on a matter of general public interest shall take place in the House except on a motion made with the consent of the Speaker.”

Motions for raising discussion on matters of general public interest are usually tabled in two forms. In the first case, the House takes note of a document laid on the Table, while under the second, the position regarding a specific matter is taken into consideration by the House.

The first form is generally used in respect of a motion which seeks to discuss a report or a statement, etc. laid on the Table of the House. The motion in this form is a non-committal substantive motion and is submitted to the vote of the House at the end of the discussion. Such motions are discussed under rule 191 of the Rules of Procedure.

The second form of motion is generally used when a policy or a situation or a statement or any other matter is taken into consideration. Such motions are discussed under Rule 342 of the Rules of Procedure. The motion in this form is not submitted to the vote of the House at the end of the debate. However, if a member moves a substantive motion in substitution of the original motion, the vote of the House is taken thereon.

GOVERNMENT BILLS

A Bill is the draft of a legislative proposal. It has to pass through various stages before it becomes an Act of Parliament. The legislative process starts with the introduction of a Bill in either House of Parliament—Lok Sabha or Rajya Sabha. A Government Bill can be introduced by a Minister.

It is necessary for a member-in-charge of the Bill to ask for leave to introduce the Bill. If leave is granted by the House, the Bill is introduced. This stage is known as the First Reading of the Bill. If the motion for leave to introduce a Bill is opposed, the Speaker may, in his discretion, allow brief explanatory statement to be made by the member who opposes the motion and the member-in-charge who moved the motion. Where a motion for leave to introduce a Bill is opposed on the ground that the Bill initiates legislation outside the legislative competence of the House, the Speaker may permit a full discussion thereon. Thereafter, the question is put to the vote of the House. However, the motion for leave to introduce a Finance Bill or an Appropriation Bill is forthwith put to the vote of the House.

PRIVATE MEMBER BILLS

“In Lok Sabha, the last two and a half hours of a sitting on every Friday are generally allotted for transaction of “Private Members’ Business”, i.e., Private Members’ Bills and Private Members’ Resolutions. Every member of Parliament, who is not a Minister, is called a Private Member.

 If there is no sitting of the House on a Friday, the Speaker may direct that two and a half hours on any other day in the week may be allotted for the transaction of Private Members’ Business.

 Business relating to Bills and Resolutions is transacted on alternate Fridays starting with Bills on the first Friday of the session and Resolutions on the next Friday and so on. Private Members’ Business set down for the day allotted for that class of business and not disposed of on that day,is not set down for any subsequent day unless it has gained priority at the ballot with reference to that day. Business which was, however, under discussion at the end of that day has precedence over all other business set down for the next allotted day.

SEARCH YOUR MP

Or

Selected MP